Why Do We Have Banned Books Week?

It’s that time of the year! Tomorrow starts banned book week, a week where we celebrate and discuss banned books. What is a banned book you might ask? Banned books are books or printed writing that has been removed from libraries, schools, bookstores, etc. due to controversial content. A book can be challenged by a parent whose child is attending a school and has a book on their curriculum/in their library. While these books do become banned, there’s a large population of people who disagree. A challenged book, however, is different.  According to the ALA, a challenged book is any book that someone has made an attempt to remove or restrict books or written material, based on that person’s opinions and perceptions of the book or material. This means they although some tried to remove it, it didn’t get banned/removed.

Why do we have banned book week? 

We celebrate banned book week annually every September because the freedom we have to read all different types of books! It’s important to read these banned books, talk about them, and advocate for them. This week allows us to remember that there’s books every year getting challenged, banned, or censored in libraries and schools. It allows people like librarians, teachers, publishers, readers, etc. to discuss ALL books! Whenever we talk about these books in September, it lets everyone know, not that bookish people, that books are still being censored and we need to talk about them. This is a worldwide event, not just in North America!

When did we start banned book week?

Banned Books Week began in the 1980s when books were endlessly getting challenged. There had been many protests involving banned books, specifically due to the Island Trees School District, v. Pico in 1982, a Supreme Court case that eventually ruled that schools can’t ban the books in their libraries simply because of their content. That same year, banned books were shown at the American Booksellers Association BookExpo (sound familiar?) in a large case near the front of the convention. It basically portrayed that people found these books dangerous.

What causes a book to get banned?

There is many different things that can allow a book to get banned or even challenged. Here’s a list of the most common reasons books are banned:

  • sexually explicit content
  • cursing
  • violence
  • lgbtq+
  • religious affiliations or blasphemous language
  • witchcraft and the occult (lol)
  • drug use/abuse
  • age inappropriate

Reasons for book challenges: LGBTQIA+, political viewpoint, obscenity, profanity, nudity, violence, sex education, cultural insensitivity, religious viewpoint, dirty magazines, teen suicide, pornographic, glorifies criminals

Who bans books?

Who initiates challenges in 2018. 13% board/administration 10% librarians/teachers 6% political/religious groups 3% elected officials 3% students

What books are banned?

Here’s the most popular banned books:

  • The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger
  • Harry Potter and the Sorcerers Stone by J.K. Rowling
  • To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
  • The Color Purple by Alice Walker
  • The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

& MANY, MANY MORE. I’ll be highlighting some and writing several blog posts about books that are banned this week! Stay tuned for those. 🙂Image result for banned book week display 1982

Sources:

 

Over on my Tumblr, I asked you guys to share with me the banned books that make you MOST angry. Here’s the link to that post!

 

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WWW Wednesday | September 18th

This is essentially a tag created by Taking on a World of Words! You just answer the three W’s:

What are you currently reading?
What did you recently finish reading?
What do you think you’ll read next?

So, let’s get into it!

  • What are you currently reading?

Right now, I’m currently reading Nevernight by Jay Kristoff! Everyone seemed to be reading it so I wanted to join in on the fun. My audiobook pick right now The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas!

  • What did you recently finish reading?

I recently finished the Testaments by Margaret Atwood and I loved it! I ended up giving it five out of five stars.

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@uponthepages on insta
  • What do you think you’ll read next?

Hopefully, Godsgrave by Jay Kristoff!

My Impossible Fall TBR 🍂

Watch my Youtube video talking about these books here!

 

This blog post is gonna be a LONG one. My Fall TBR is never ending. I keep adding to it every day but as of now, here’s what I want to read this fall:

I’m going to start off with the books I’ve already read on this TBR!

★★★★★ out of ★★★★★ stars (5/5)

★★★ ½ out of ★★★★★ stars (3.5/5)

★★★ ½ out of ★★★★★ stars (3.5/5)

★★★★ out of ★★★★★ stars (4/5

★★★  out of ★★★★★ stars (3/5)

★★★★★ out of ★★★★★ stars (5/5)

★★★★½ out of ★★★★★ stars (4.5/5)

  • The Crucible by Arthur Miller
  • Ninth House by Leigh Bardugo
  • The Fellowship of the Ring by J.R.R. Tolkien
  • Scythe by Neal Schusterman
  • An Absolutely Remarkable Thing by Hank Green
  • Wayward Son by Rainbow Rowell
  • The Ship of the Dead by Rick Riordan
  • The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas
  • Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
  • Three Women by Lisa Taddeo
  • Looking for Alaska by John Green
  • Call Down the Hawk by Maggie Stiefvater
  • Little Women by Louisa May Alcott
  • Well Met by Jen DeLuca
  • Vanity Fair’s Women on Women
  • The Near Witch by Victoria Schwab
  • Aphrodite Made Me Do It by Trista Mateer
  • Shades of Magic vol. 1 by V.E. Schwab
  • The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde
  • Six of Crows by Leigh Bardugo
  • The Diviners by Libba Bray
  • Kingdom of Ash by Sarah J. Maas
  • Death of a Salesman by Arthur Miller
  • Nevernight by Jay Kristoff

If you want to keep updated with my Fall TBR and how I’m doing, here’s my Goodreads list!

What are you reading this Fall?

To hear my thoughts elsewhere, follow me on social media: Goodreads | BookTubeInstagram | Twitter